Social TV

I first recognized the importance of texting when I realized it was the only way I could reach my teenage son. I discovered through a lot of trial and error that he couldn’t be bothered answering his cell phone, but that a text message would bring a rapid-fire response. I was also dismayed (I mean, enlightened) when his older sister gave him a congratulatory high five when he hit 3000 texts in a month.

Just last week a Boston daily newspaper ran a timely piece titled, “Mobile Madness Growing in Hub.” The article included a quote from a 17-year-old who admitted that she would be lost without her iPhone. Her favorite uses included transferring money into her bank account, looking up train schedules and using Google Maps for directions. She commented, “I once went for a day without it and it was the most painful day of my entire life.”

When my teenage son sits down to relax in front of the TV he is surrounded by technology: TV, laptop and cell phone. He’s watching, updating social media accounts and texting at the same time. He’s not alone. According to Nielsen, 57% of viewers are browsing the web while watching TV. Welcome the new and improved TV experience.

simlutaneous_media

At it’s root, the experience refers to the integration of the web and other emerging technologies into the television experience and how this integration has helped to further personalize and socialize the medium.. For example TiVo has integrated web content and user control into their products (and vice versa) while social media platforms like MySpace have added TV streams to their sites.

With these trends in mind, if I were a TV executive now, I would take note to avoid being left on the sidelines. The future is clear for TV, mobile, the internet and all technologies: convergence. No more desk tops, mousses or dedicated pieces of technology. Users will continue to expect immediate information that, powered by connectivity, eventually becomes ubiquitous. As our real world and virtual worlds continue to meld, our social connections will expand further. Over time, the interests and social interactions that we consider our own, are destined to become part of a shared history.

Sage Peterson

Managing PR in a Crisis: An exclusive panel discussion produced by AMA Boston

ama-logo_resized

“Two experienced divers die mysteriously in the tunnel from Boston to Deer Island. Archdiocese of Boston officials cover up an insidious scandal that spans decades of sexual abuse. U.S. forces invade Iraq while longtime American allies howl in protest.

Only well-prepared, quick-thinking PR experts with prolific backgrounds in crisis management could manage—and succeed—in defusing these controversies. Our distinguished panel of experts are looking forward to sharing their experiences addressing these and other crises through the application of proven PR tools and techniques.

While most businesses have an emergency plan to protect their staff and office systems in the event of a natural disaster, few have developed a communications plan to address public crises such as lawsuits, improper behavior by employees or product recalls. The power of the social web and 24/7 news coverage can amplify public perception and corporate crises can quickly spiral out of control. Today, more than ever, it is imperative for companies to be prepared.”

Sign up for this great opportunity to hear Tom Lee and other PR professionals discuss how to prepare for and manage PR in a crisis:  http://pr-crisis.eventbrite.com

451 Marketing's Strategize or Die Workshop Will Be Held On 10/22/09

You know about social media, you want to use social media, you have a budget for social media, but you are worried about wasting time and resources, if you don’t do it right. 451 Marketing’s Strategize or Die! Workshop can help!

October’s workshop will take a close look at several examples of both B2B and B2C companies that have used social media successfully, as well as those that have failed in using social media. The pros at 451 Marketing will provide attendees with a preliminary plan to formulate a social media strategy for 2010.

When: 8:00am – 10:00am, October 22nd
Where: The Westin Copley Place (10 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA 02116)

The workshop is free to attend and is open only to non-agency personnel.

Follow this event on Twitter with hashtag 451Strategy.

Sign up here!

Medium Regular with Milk and Four Sugars

Looking at the consumer landscape, it is easy to pick out brands that have been with us for as long as we can remember. Immediately, you might think of brands like Coca-Cola, Apple, IBM, McDonald’s and many others. Their personalities are emblazoned in our minds to the point where we can recite their popular jingles and possibly even draw their logos on paper. This is called, “unaided awareness,” meaning you have a subconscious attachment to the brand. This is due, in part, to the personal connections we have developed with these brands over the years. For example, I remember when I worked with my dad on my first summer job. I was 13, and every day, we’d wake up at the crack of dawn and head over to Dunkin Donuts. I’d get a donut or a bagel with some kind of juice. But, my dad would order a croissant and a coffee. He’d have it how he still has it to this day, medium regular with milk and four sugars.  We’d then sit in the car and talk over our breakfast until we had to punch in for work. Those moments with my dad are moments I’ll never forget, and Dunkin Donuts will always be a part of that story.

Dunkin_Donuts_logo

But, how is it that Dunkin Donuts and other long-standing brands like it, has managed to stay relevant to an ever-changing audience? It is about acknowledging the past and giving credence to the present. What does this mean? When we think about brands that have been with us for decades, some for more than a century, we have to realize that they have survived amid enormous cultural change. Including different generations of evolving mindsets, like my fathers generation as well as my own. For example, when Starbucks entered the picture and fixed itself upon global domination, Dunkin Donuts did not rush out to make its brand more youth oriented by adding gradients or cleaner typography. What did the company do? It stuck with its candy colored pink and hot dog font and just added a coffee cup next to their logo. It didn’t put on airs or presume to be something it was not. Dunkin Donuts, as well as other long-standing brands, has learned to adapt, but has not forgotten itself in the process. Many brands have created a presence for themselves through social media outlets like Twitter, Facebook, etc… Does this mean they have sold out? Absolutely not, it means that they have recognized the need to continue to stay relevant to their ever-changing customer base. If you look at other brands that have stood the test of time, this ethos continues to ring true. They all stay honest to their brand and their consumers, but still manage to adapt by leveraging change as an opportunity to further interact with their customers, responding to their questions, while also reaching new generations of consumers.

Does this really make sense? To this day, whenever I need a pick me up, where do I go? Even though Starbucks may be next door, I walk the few extra minutes to the Dunkin Donuts down the block, to get my medium regular with milk and four sugars

Strategize or Die! How Fortune 1000 Companies Build Social Media Strategies

wp_strategize_thumb

“You know about social media, you want to use social media, you have a budget for social media, but you are worried about wasting time and resources, if you don’t do it right. Worse yet, you have heard the horror stories about social media causing tremendous damage to brands and you want to know how to avoid any potential catastrophes. This paper will take a close look at companies that have failed and what they did wrong. It will also give you preliminary steps to help you get started on formulating a social media strategy for 2010.”

Read full white paper here